CEDLA Events

Join our mailing list!

To ensure that you don't miss out on events, exhibitions, engaging educational programs, latest courses, research, publications and other news, please join our mailing list today! We will not spam your mailbox, but send you a newsletter around twice per month.

STUDYING AT CEDLA


CEDLA is considered to be one of Europe’s leading Latin American Studies institutes. Its staff members are experienced researchers and qualified teachers. CEDLA has a large library with a unique collection. Facilities such as student work stations, internet and computer access, and lecture rooms are excellent. CEDLA is pivotal to the Latin American Studies community in the Netherlands. 

CEDLA-Lecture-Dream-of-a-Sunday-Afternoon-in-Alameda-Park-by-Diego-Rivera.jpg

MAY

13

13 May 2022, 15:30-17:00 at CEDLA

In the Name of Christ: Violence, Religion, and Politics in Post-Revolutionary Mexico

Gema Kloppe-Santamaria, Assistant Professor of Latin American History at Loyola University Chicago
Discussant: Prof. Wil Pansters, Utrecht University

 

What were the political and cultural drivers that contributed to shaping Catholics’ understanding of violence as a legitimate means to defend their religious practices and beliefs in post-revolutionary Mexico? In this talk, Dr. Gema Santamaria will focus on the 1930s-1950s, a period marked by the end of the Cristero War (1927-1929) - Mexico’s armed conflict over the religious question - and the so-called détente between the Mexican state and the Catholic Church. Despite the Church’s official rejection of the use of violence amongst the faithful, during this period Catholics continued to engage in belligerent and violent forms of religious militancy in the name of Christ and religious freedom. This, she argues, reflects the weight that non-canonical understandings of martyrdom, sacrifice, and redemptive violence had in Catholics’ exercise of religion. Catholics’ aggressive defence of religious symbols and places, together with their attacks against individuals perceived as “polluting” or “impious”, show that moral and symbolic considerations were deeply intertwined with uncompromising political ideologies and long-term intra-community conflicts.