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  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

    Image by Steven Mason Out of gallery CEDLA Researchers Dr Arij Ouweneel Assistant Professor RESEARCH THEME: (PUBLIC) HISTORY, CULTURAL COGNITIVE STUDIES Arij Ouweneel is Associate Professor at CEDLA and was Special Professor of Historical Anthropology of the Amerindian Peoples at the Universiteit Utrecht from 1999 to 2004. He graduated cum laude in Social-Economic History at the Universiteit Leiden in 1983 and received his PhD cum laude in Social-Economic History at the same university in 1989. Over the past decade he changed from colonial history to contemporary public history and the cognitive cultural studies (psychology of art). RESEARCH INTEREST Ouweneel’s current field of study is public history. This field studies the representation of history in the public sphere. One line of inquiry in this field regards film makers, painters, or cartoonists as public historians in their own right. This is the line that stands central in Ouweneel’s current research, analyzing source material from Spain, Germany, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Colombia, Argentina and Mexico. Theoretically, he tries to amend this work on public histories with insights from the cognitive sciences, especially the applied psychology of art. The essence of this is that in large measure information processing is mediated by learned or innate mental structures that organize related pieces of our knowledge. Because a narrative cultural memory is a specific cognitive schema, its parameters and elements can be identified analyzing artifacts. A specific focus of Ouweneel's investigations is on Amerindian history. He started his career writing about the self-confident position of Amerindians in Bourbon Mexico (Shadows over Anáhuac, The Flight of the Shepherd), but changed over the past decades to the history of the present (Terug naar Macondo, Freudian Fadeout, Resilient Memories). Recently he finished a manuscript on Frida Kahlo and the Intervening Agent, in Dutch and soon also in English. ​ SELECTED PUBLICATIONS 2018 Ouweneel, A. (2018). Resilient Memories: Amerindian Cognitive Schemas in Latin American Art. (Cognitive Approaches to Culture). Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University Press. Ouweneel, A. (2018). Contemporary Amerindian imaginaries and the challenge of intersectional analysis. In F. L. Aldama (Ed.), The Routledge Companion to Gender, Sex and Latin American Culture (pp. 263-272). (Routledge Companions to Gender). London: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315179728 Ouweneel, A. (Accepted/In press). Outsmarting the Lords of Death: An Amerindian Cognitive Script in Comics. In F. L. Aldama (Ed.), Graphing TransIndigenous Comic Books Tucson: University of Arizona Press. 2015 Ouweneel, A. (2015). One Block at a Time: Performing the Neighbourhood. In C. Klaufus, & A. Ouweneel (Eds.), Housing and Belonging in Latin America (pp. 294-319). New York: Berghahn. 2012 Ouweneel, A. (2012). Freudian Fadeout: The Failings of Psychoanalysis in Film Criticism. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company. Ouweneel, A. (2012). Us and Them: Researching Deep Roots of Andean Culture. In A. Ouweneel (Ed.), Andeans and their use of cultural resources: Space, gender, rights & identity (pp. 107-129). (Cuadernos del CEDLA; Vol. 25). Amsterdam: CEDLA. 2005 Ouweneel, A. (2005). The Flight of the Shepherd: Microhistory and the Psychology of Cultural Resilience in Bourbon Central Mexico. (CEDLA Latin America Studies; Vol. 93). Amsterdam: Aksant. 2004 Ouweneel, A. (2004). El debate Villalobos: Amerindios en McWorld. In Cruzando fronteras: reflexiones sobre la relevancia de fronteras históricas, simbólicas y casi desaparecidas en América Latina (pp. 147-181). Quito: Abya Yala. 2003 Ouweneel, A. (2003). The 'Collapse' of the Peruvian Ayllu. In T. Salman, & A. Zoomers (Eds.), Imaging the Andes: shifting margins of a marginal world (pp. 81-98). (CEDLA Latin America studies; Vol. 91). Amsterdam: Aksant. 2000 Ouweneel, A. (2000). El gobernador de indios, el repartimiento de comercios y la caja de comunidad en los pueblos de indios del México central (siglo xviii). In M. Menegus (Ed.), El repartimiento forzoso de mercancías en México, Perú y Filipinas (pp. 65-88). Mexico DF: CEU UNAM. Ouweneel, A. (2000). Representing the Core of Maya culture. In P. van Dijck, & E. al. (Eds.), Fronteras: Towards a Borderless Latin America (pp. 275-291). (CEDLA Latin America studies; Vol. 87). Amsterdam: CEDLA, University of Amsterdam.

  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

    Captura de Pantalla 2019-10-13 a les 20. Out of gallery CEDLA Researchers Dr Fabio de Castro Assistant Professor RESEARCH THEME: BRAZILIAN STUDIES & HUMAN ECOLOGY Fábio de Castro is Assistant Professor of Brazilian Studies. He is an environmental anthropologist with MSc in Ecology in 1992 (State University of Campinas, Brazil) and PhD in Environmental Science/Anthropology in 2000 (Indiana University, USA). Fabio has research experience with academic, non-governmental and governmental organizations in Brazil and in the United States. He is a collaborating researcher at the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (Indiana University, USA), and at the Center for Maritime Research (MARE), University of Amsterdam). Fábio is interested in the socio-ecological processes shaping patterns of resource use and management. His research focuses on local governance of natural resource and the dilemma between conservation and development goals at local and broader scales. His interdisciplinary background is reflected in his theoretical and methodological approach, combining ethnographic, historical, socioeconomic, institutional and ecological data to understand how patterns of resource use are shaped and transformed. Fabio is particularly interested in the connections between processes across socio-ecological scales, and how partnerships between users, government and private sectors influence resource conservation. RESEARCH INTEREST Fábio de Castro has conducted research in many different sites in the Amazon and Atlantic Forest in Brazil. He is currently working on two main projects: 1) Political ecology of the implementation of agro-extractive reserves in the Amazonian floodplain a. Institutional arrangement of co-management systems b. Participatory and collaborative process c. Social and ecological performance of the reserves 2) Socio-ecological dimension of the biodiesel program in Brazil a. Institutional framework of the biodiesel program b. Social relations between farmers, biodiesel producers and the governmental agencies c. Economic and social performance of the feedstock production (oil seeds) by small farmers 3) Territorial governance of protected areas in Brazil a. Compilation of protected areas b. Institutional arrangement of different categories of protected areas c. Comparison with land governance for agrarian development 1er Congreso Latinoamericano IASC Vean la grabación del PANEL organizado por Dr. Fábio de Castro (CEDLA): Contribución Latinoamericana a los Debates Teóricos sobre Bienes Comunes El propósito de este panel es explorar cómo el contexto latinoamericano puede contribuir a la construcción teórica de los bienes comunes. Por un lado, la región se caracteriza por una historia de desigualdad, violencia y baja calidad democrática que ha apoyado procesos de “descomunización”; por otro lado, la región tiene una historia de resistencia política, creatividad social y diversidad cultural que ha apoyado procesos de ‘recomunización’. GRABACIÓN DEL EVENTO

  • RIVERHOOD. Living Rivers and the New Water Justice Movements

    New CEDLA - UvA Projects We are happy to announce that the ERC Consolidator Grant proposal of Prof. dr. Rutgerd Boelens (CEDLA - UvA) has been accepted by EU Horizon 2020 “RIVERHOOD. Living Rivers and the New Water Justice Movements: From Dominating Waterscapes to the Rights of Nature” It is a 5-years project that will study ‘riverhood’ and ‘translocal water justice movements’ in Europe and Latin America. This project will be coordinated from the Wageningen University (WUR) with an strong bridge to CEDLA-UvA. The proposal counted also with invaluable inputs from many of the CEDLA's research team. We are specially glad because the proposal’s evaluation was graded as ‘excellent’ and ‘exceptional’. The project will start in Spring 2021. The project includes 4 fully financed PhDs and the means to develop, among other activities, ‘environmental justice labs’ in The Netherlands, Spain, Ecuador and Colombia, with a large number of grassroots, academic and policy-making partners. The total grant is 2 million euros. ABSTRACT: “RIVERHOOD will study, conceptualize and support evolving water justice movements that struggle for enlivening rivers. Notwithstanding rivers’ fundamental importance for social and natural well-being, around the world, mega-damming, pollution, and multiple forms of domesticating are putting riverine systems under great stress. Expert ontologies and epistemologies have become cornerstones of powerful hydraulic-bureaucratic administrations (‘hydrocracies’). Recently, worldwide, a large variety of ‘new water justice movements’ (NWJMs) have proliferated. These are transdisciplinary, multi-actor and multi-scalar coalitions. They deploy alternative river-society ontologies and practices, challenging hydrocracies’ paradigms to foster environmental justice. They translate global notions into local ones and vice versa. New, exciting strategies include, among others, New Water Culture and Rights of Nature notions. European NWJMs co-learn with peers in Ecuador and Colombia were rivers are legal and political subjects. NWJMs hold immense potential for contributing to a radically new, equitable and nature-rooted water governance, but are undertheorized, largely unnoticed by natural and social sciences, and excluded from policy-making. Science and policies lack approaches to engage with rivers as arenas of co-production among humans and nature. RIVERHOOD will develop a new analytical framework to study NWJMs and ‘riverhoods’. Through 4 cross-cultural PhD studies, 8 cases in Ecuador, Colombia, Spain and the Netherlands are investigated. At each site ‘Environmental Justice Labs’ will be organized: a novel approach to comprehend pluriversal water worlds and foster knowledge co-creation and democratization.” Rutgerd Boelens is Professor 'Political Ecology of Water in Latin America' holding a part-time special chair with CEDLA and the University of Amsterdam (Fac. Social and Behavioral Sciences FMG/GPIO and Fac. Humanities). He also works as Professor Water Governance and Social Justice at Wageningen University (Environmental Sciences Group, Water Resources Management), and is Visiting Professor at the Catholic University of Peru and the Central University of Ecuador. He directs the international Justicia Hídrica /Water Justice alliance, engaged with comparative research and training on water accumulation, conflict and civil society action.

  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

    15861321254_e3b2256d14_o.jpg Out of gallery CEDLA Researchers Dr Annelou Ypeij Assistant Professor RESEARCH THEME: ANTROPHOLOGY Annelou Ypeij has been assistant professor at CEDLA since January 2003. She graduated cum laude in anthropology at Utrecht University in 1990. Five years later she defended her dissertation at the same university. The subject concerned the informal economy of Lima. From 1997 to 2002, she worked as a post-doctoral researcher at Erasmus University Rotterdam on poverty within the welfare state in Amsterdam RESEARCH INTEREST Broadly formulated, her research interests encompass poverty, social mobility, gender, ethnicity and livelihood strategies. Annelou Ypeij has done extensive fieldwork in Peru and The Netherlands. In Lima, Peru, she analysed why female micro-entrepreneurs working in the informal economy earn structurally less than their male counterparts do. In The Netherlands she studied single motherhood and poverty in the welfare state. Currently she is working on two research projects. The first one centres on tourism in the Cusco-Machu Picchu region, the impact of tourism on local communities, and the way people seize new economic opportunities in the tourism industry. Annelou Ypeij focuses on the ethnic and gender identities of women and men working in the lowest echelons of the labour market and their livelihood strategies. The second research project concerns a study on gender, family relations and social mobility in the urban context. In the Cono Norte of Lima she is collecting life histories to better understand the processes of national and international migration, changing gender and ethnic identities, social mobility and other family dynamics. She is also involved in making a documentary by visual anthropologist Sharis Coppens about the Peruvian rockband Uchpa. See www.chichafilms.nl and www.chichafilms.nl/in-ontwikkeling/ .

  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

    Latin American Studies.jpg Out of gallery CEDLA Researchers Dr Christien Klaufus Assistant Professor RESEARCH THEME: URBAN STUDIES, HUMAN GEOGRAPHY Christien Klaufus joined CEDLA in April 2008 as Assistant Professor of Human Geography. She graduated in Architecture and Urbanism at Eindhoven University of Technology in 1993 and in Cultural Anthropology (cum laude) at the University of Amsterdam in 1999. In 2006 she received her PhD in Anthropology at Utrecht University. From 1999 to 2001 and from 2006 to 2008 she worked as a researcher at OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies at Delft University of Technology, where she studied self-provided housing in The Netherlands. RESEARCH INTEREST Christien’s research addresses two themes that are broadly related to what UN-Habitat calls the new urban transition in Latin America. The first research line focuses on the drivers of urbanization in intermediate cities. Processes of peri-urbanization are analyzed within the context of transnational migration and remittance spending to understand how planned urban growth and urbanization-from-below contribute to the development of medium-sized cities. The project speaks to two strands of literature: 1) the role of architecture as a catalyst of social and cultural change; 2) the debates on the densification of peri-urban areas in the context of local planning capacities. Research has been conducted so far in Ecuador, Peru, Guatemala and El Salvador. The second line of research encompasses the sustainability agenda’s effects on urban deathscapes. Latin American urban deathscapes are undergoing changes to increase the efficiency of scarce urban land; to meet norms for cleaner, healthier environments; and to develop decent and affordable dead-disposal for vulnerable groups. Considering that urban deathscapes are micro-cosmoses of larger urban societies, this project explores both urban policies and everyday practices and connects to a variety of debates on place-making, heritage conservation, gentrification, social inequality, urban violence, the power of the death industry, and environmental sustainability. The project started with case studies in Bogotá and Medellín, Colombia and is bound to include other Latin American metropolises in the near future. Societies worldwide are urbanizing at high speed. In 2050 almost 70 percent of the world population is projected to be urban. Advancing the planning of sustainable urban land use is an urgent theme. Infrastructure has to be provided to 6.4 billion people. This means that water, electricity and sewage systems will have to be improved and smarter mass transport systems to be developed. One of the basic human necessities not explicitly addressed in urban theories and policy prospects is the need for sufficient dignified spaces for dead disposal and commemoration, in other words ‘deathscapes’. The right to a dignified final destination is a basic human right. Yet, as part of the urban infrastructure, deathscapes tend to be developed rather haphazardly. Two tendencies increase the need for more knowledge on urban deathscapes, and hence, for an integrated field of deathscape studies: first, the demographic transition underway in several regions that will result in an aging population; and second, the intention formulated in the Sustainable Development Goals for 2030, specifically in Goal 11 to build more compact and high-density cities. Higher population densities in cities urge us to find more space-efficient solutions for dead disposal too. In practice, this will arguably result in an increasing separation between disposal spaces and commemoration spaces. As one of the most urbanized regions in the world, Latin America figures prominently in the urban studies literature. In order to be better prepared for rapid urbanization processes taking place in other regions of the Global South, Latin American models are often used to exemplify desired and undesired policy outcomes. However, information about the development and transformation of urban deathscapes in Latin America is remarkably scarce, especially in comparison to the large amount of studies that have addressed deathscapes in Asian cities (e.g. Kong, 2012; Tan and Yeoh, 2002; Teather et al., 2001; Tremlett, 2007). This interdisciplinary program aims to provide a grounded understanding of the ways in which deathscapes in cities have been developed in the recent past as part of urban space and society, and the ways in which they would need to be developed to safeguard socially and environmentally sustainable urban futures. The program considers the urban deathscape to be a relevant locus for research on cities and, vice versa, it posits that the future of cities depends in part on the question how the ‘cities of the living’ find new forms of co-existence with the ‘cities of the dead’; how deathscapes can potentially be or become formative sites of conviviality for the city at large. Planning and governing deathscapes in high-density urban areas touches upon a myriad of pressing themes that are integrally addressed in this project. ​ SELECTED PUBLICATIONS 2020 Klaufus, C. (2020). Safeguarding the House of the Dead: Configurations of Risk and Protection in the Urban Cemetery. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2427.12890 ​ del Castillo, M. L., & Klaufus, C. (2020). Rent-seeking middle classes and the short-term rental business in inner-city Lima. Urban Studies, 57(12), 2547-2563. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098019881351 ​ 2019 ​ van Noorloos, F., Klaufus, C., & Steel, G. (2019). 'Land in urban debates: Unpacking the grab-development dichotomy'. Urban Studies, 56(5), 855-867. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042098018789019 ​ Klaufus, C. (2019) 'Superstar-Saints and Wandering Souls: The Cemetery as a Cultural Hotspot in Latin American Cities'. In H. Selin, and R.M. Rakoff (Eds.), Death Across Cultures: Death and Dying in Non-Western Cultures (pp. 275-294). (Science across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Science; Vol. 9). Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-18826-9_17 ​ 2018 ​ Klaufus, C. (2018) ‘Colombian deathscapes: Social practices and policy responses’, Journal of Urban Affairs 40(2): 209-225. ​ 2017 ​ Klaufus, C (2017) ‘Cemetery modernization and the common good in Bogotá’, Bulletin of Latin American Research 37(2): 206-221. Steel, G., F. van Noorloos & C. Klaufus (2017) ‘The urban land debate in the global South: new avenues for research’, Geoforum 83: 133-141. Klaufus, C., P. van Lindert, F. van Noorloos & G. Steel (2017) ‘All-inclusiveness versus exclusion: urban project development in Latin America and Africa’, Sustainability 9(11), 2038; doi:10.3390/su9112038 (open access). Klaufus, C. (2017) ‘Informal house design in the 21st century: cholo and remittances architecture’. In: F. Hernández and A. Becerra (Eds), Marginal Urbanisms: Informal and Formal Development in Cities of Latin America, pp. 82-101. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. ACADEMIC MEMBERSHIPS DONE Death Research in the Netherlands UvA Centre for Urban Studies PROJECT MEMBERSHIPS NVT PODCAST AVAILABLE ​ Deathscapes in Latin American Metropolises How do increasingly cramped and overcrowded megacities, such as those in Latin America house the dead in their midst? And how do citizens use urban space to commemorate dead people? These and other questions guide Christien Klaufus’ research project Deathscapes in Latin American Metropolises discussed in this interview. ​

  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

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  • CEDLA | Master's Latin American Studies - University of Amsterdam

    1/3 Out of gallery ​ Welcome to our new website! ​ ​ join us LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES LASP ​ The Latin American Studies Programme (LASP) is an interuniversity graduate programme dedicated to research and graduate education on Latin America in the Netherlands. ​ COVID-19 IN LATIN AMERICA CEDLA blog series ​ CEDLA researchers and students have been developing several initiatives to assess and discuss the ways in which COVID-19 is affecting Latin American Societies. ​ CEDLA COURSES Education Programme 2020-21 ​ The courses are accessible for students of all Dutch universities and in some cases at a fee also for others interested. Find your courses here: BACHELOR COURSES - MASTER COURSES ​ EVENTS Las charlas del CEDLA ​ CEDLA has a broad and interdisciplinary offer in lectures. Our events are free and open to everybody. ​ ​ ​